FINANCES : Sortir de la boîte, Penser autrement Index du Forum

FINANCES : Sortir de la boîte, Penser autrement
Finance Européenne, Crise de la Dette, Banques, Zone Euro, Forum temporaire pour analyser l'activité , informer donner des nouvelles à ceux qui en ont envie .

 FAQFAQ   RechercherRechercher   MembresMembres   GroupesGroupes   S’enregistrerS’enregistrer 
 ProfilProfil   Se connecter pour vérifier ses messages privésSe connecter pour vérifier ses messages privés   ConnexionConnexion 

Les Banques ARCHIVES 2012 2013
Aller à la page: <  1, 2, 322, 23, 2453, 54, 55  >
 
Poster un nouveau sujet   Répondre au sujet    FINANCES : Sortir de la boîte, Penser autrement Index du Forum -> ARCHIVES Billets -> Archives Revue de presse
Sujet précédent :: Sujet suivant  
Auteur Message
Danyves
Groupe des Six

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 16 Oct 2012
Messages: 8 405

MessagePosté le: Mer 9 Jan - 18:45 (2013)    Sujet du message: Les Banques ARCHIVES 2012 2013 Répondre en citant

SchumpeterBusiness and management

AIG and the financial crisisOverdue examination
Jan 9th 2013, 13:54 by T.E. | NEW YORK
 
BEFORE imploding at extraordinary cost to the world’s financial system and America’s taxpayers, AIG was considered a financial fortress: it boasted a high stock valuation, an AAA credit rating (heavily used in the firm’s marketing which suggested that it would stand behind its commitments to customers) and was led by a chief executive, Hank Greenberg (pictured), adept at squashing critics.
This reputation enabled AIG to build a staggeringly large derivatives book, which received scant attention until the firm proved unable to meet its commitments during the financial crisis. At the time the answer of Hank Paulson, America’s then treasury secretary, was to nationalise AIG at a cost of more than $100 billion. This allowed the company to meet its obligations, but it also came with tremendous financial benefits for firms that had misjudged AIG—notably Goldman Sachs, which Mr Paulson headed from 1999 to 2006.
Now Mr Greenberg has sued, and the lawsuit may be joined by the AIG itself. He argues that the bail-out and its overly onerous terms amounted to an illegal taking of private property. But behind this argument lurks another one: that a non-nationalised AIG could have survived, if only by taking the approach of a tough insurance company which knows that the customer has little time for litigation—offering, in the midst of a panic, a cheap fast settlement. This course of action would have had obvious benefits for AIG’s shareholders, a group that included Mr Greenberg.
The prospect of having to pay recompense to a company that has already cost taxpayers billions strikes many in Congress as nauseating. Yet Mr Greenberg’s case is strengthened by how the crisis was dealt with. Though he tried many times and in many ways, Mr Paulson has been incapable of articulating a consistent principle—beyond expediency—which would justify how the bail-out was handled.
More recently, the same lack of principle can be seen in the spate of large settlements. Certain banks get hammered, whereas other institutions, notably the ones that had government appointees on their boards, such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, have been spared. The $18.5 billion deal between the government and ten banks announced on January 7th, for instance, includes no formula for how the fine was calculated. The government justifies it as recompense for vaguely defined bad behavior, the banks praise it as a simple solution.
All this is no doubt encouraging for Mr Greenberg. Beyond bullying bank executives into payments, the government’s track record for proving wrongdoing is, to be kind, slim. He is demanding that claims be justified and may drag his old company along for the ride. If there is a public policy benefit, it is that a full-blown trial could provide an overdue examination of what really happened during the financial crisis and how it was dealt with.


Comment (13)


« Tax evasion in Italy: Big government meets big data
  •  

 


Revenir en haut
Publicité






MessagePosté le: Mer 9 Jan - 18:45 (2013)    Sujet du message: Publicité

PublicitéSupprimer les publicités ?
Revenir en haut
Danyves
Groupe des Six

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 16 Oct 2012
Messages: 8 405

MessagePosté le: Mer 9 Jan - 19:49 (2013)    Sujet du message: Les Banques ARCHIVES 2012 2013 Répondre en citant

Morgan Stanley va supprimer 1.600 postes
09/01 | 17:10 | mis à jour à 17:51 
 
Les suppressions de postes devraient avoir lieu dans les semaines à venir et concernent pour moitié des postes aux Etats-Unis et pour moitié à l'international. 


Revenir en haut
Danyves
Groupe des Six

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 16 Oct 2012
Messages: 8 405

MessagePosté le: Mer 9 Jan - 20:51 (2013)    Sujet du message: Les Banques ARCHIVES 2012 2013 Répondre en citant

UBS Rooting Out 'Negative Elements'
UBS lost sight of its historic principles during a growth spree, the head of its investment bank said, setting the backdrop for the interest-rate fixing scandal that cost it $1.5 billion in settlements with regulators. 


Revenir en haut
Danyves
Groupe des Six

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 16 Oct 2012
Messages: 8 405

MessagePosté le: Mer 9 Jan - 20:56 (2013)    Sujet du message: Les Banques ARCHIVES 2012 2013 Répondre en citant

The ECB Tutorial in Successful Jawboning DAVID WESSELLIKE THIS COLUMNIST





Central bankers always have had a lot of power, notably the power to print money and move interest rates. The past few years have revealed the power of their words. 
 
The Federal Reserve has been influencing financial markets with pledges to keep rates low for "an extended period" or, recently, until the unemployment rate falls below 6.5%. These days, scholars seeking to understand how monetary policy moves economies are looking more closely at "communications" and "signaling" than at the money supply. 
 
Enlarge Image








Balint PornecziECB President Mario Draghi

 
 
The clearest example comes from Europe. In July, Mario Draghi, president of the European Central Bank, defused an intensifying crisis of confidence in the euro with two sentences scribbled in the margins of an otherwise routine speech. "Within our mandate, the ECB is ready to do whatever it takes to preserve the euro," he said. "And believe me, it will be enough." 
 
That may prove to be the most successful central-bank verbal intervention in history. 
 
A few weeks later, the ECB pledged to buy bonds of governments shunned by markets if those governments made belt-tightening commitments accepted by fellow euro-zone countries. No government has sought that help so the ECB hasn't spent a single euro. Yet global anxiety about an imminent euro crisis has abated. 
 
Prepared by number-crunching Ph.D.s at the ECB, the chart accompanying this column tracks financial markets' assessment of the risk that two or more euro-zone governments would default in the following 12 months. The gauge rose, was curbed temporarily by the May 2010 creation of a European bailout fund and some ad hoc ECB bond buying, then soared. It remained high until Mr. Draghi spoke in July, then fell sharply. 
 
Europe hasn't solved any fundamental problem. Several economies are burdened by huge debt loads. Austerity has contributed to deep recessions. Southern Europe's wages and productivity make its exports uncompetitive with Germany's. Prospects for growth are lousy. Forging a pan-European banking union and deposit-insurance fund—or a broader political union—remains more talk than action. 
 
Yet euro-anxiety has abated. How did Mr. Draghi pull this off? 
 
A bit of background: The creation of the euro made it easy for investors to flee a country's bonds. Worried about Spain? Simply move euros to Germany. If such a run happened in the U.S. or the U.K., the Fed or Bank of England could print money and buy the bonds that investors were abandoning. Spain can't: It surrendered that power to the ECB. If Spain were a typical emerging market, the value of its currency would collapse—and that, in turn, would make its wares attractive to foreigners. But Spain doesn't have its own currency. 
 
"Government-bond markets in a monetary union are inherently fragile," Belgian economist Paul De Grauwe has written. "Euro-zone nations issue debt in a 'foreign' currency, over which they have no real control." In a classic run on a solvent bank, the textbook response is for the central bank to lend the bank cash to pay depositors. But when a country in Europe faces a run, the ECB has been reluctant to be that "lender of last resort." So investors demanded higher interest rates from Spain and Italy, worried either that they wouldn't be paid back or that the euro zone would break up and they might be paid back in some currency other than euros. 
 
Mr. Draghi saw this. His first move was to make banks three-year loans (a long time in central-bank lending) so they could buy government bonds. That worked for few months. When investors grew itchy, some of the ECB's Germans argued for no further action to keep the pressure on elected politicians to do what needed to be done on spending, taxes, deficits and regulation. Mr. Draghi apparently decided that approach threatened to destroy the euro, hence his "whatever it takes" pledge. 
 
The message to markets was that if there were a run on Spain or Italy, the ECB would be there as long as the governments of Europe gave it cover. So Spain doesn't need to go begging to the rest of Europe and the ECB because the rates it is paying to borrow have fallen. But the reason rates have fallen is that markets figure Spain can get help if needed. This convenient stalemate has eased global fears that the euro will implode. The ECB may never buy a single Spanish bond. 
 
But (there's always a "but") a couple of problems: One, this stalemate has left Spain with an unemployment rate of 26.6%, and that isn't a typo. Two, no one is sure how this would work if Spain did pull the emergency lever. Would the ECB set a ceiling on Spanish rates? Would it stop buying Spanish bonds if Spain didn't keep its fiscal promises, as it says it would? Would investors respond by buying more Spanish bonds because prospects for repayment improved—or by dumping their portfolios onto the ECB? 
 
Mr. Draghi undoubtedly is hoping words will suffice. 
 

 
 
 
 


Revenir en haut
Danyves
Groupe des Six

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 16 Oct 2012
Messages: 8 405

MessagePosté le: Mer 9 Jan - 22:42 (2013)    Sujet du message: Les Banques ARCHIVES 2012 2013 Répondre en citant

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2012-12-09/historic-inversion-shadow-banking-now-complete


Back in June, we wrote an article titled "On The Verge Of A Historic Inversion In Shadow Banking" in which we showed that for the first time since December 1995, the total "shadow liabilities" in the United States - the deposit-free funding instruments that serve as credit to those unregulated institutions that are financial banks in all but name (i.e., they perform maturity, credit and liquidity transformations) - were on the verge of being once more eclipsed by traditional bank funding liabilities. As of Thursday, this inversion is now a fact, with Shadow Bank liabilities representing less in notional than traditional liabilities.


Dernière édition par Danyves le Mer 9 Jan - 23:12 (2013); édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut
Danyves
Groupe des Six

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 16 Oct 2012
Messages: 8 405

MessagePosté le: Mer 9 Jan - 23:12 (2013)    Sujet du message: Les Banques ARCHIVES 2012 2013 Répondre en citant

21:48 AIG exclut de traîner l'Etat américain en justice (Les Echos)
AIG exclut de traîner l'Etat américain en justice
Par Lucie Robequain | 09/01 | 21:48
 
 
Après avoir laissé plané le doute quelques jours, AIG exclut finalement de poursuivre l'Etat en justice. Des actionnaires de l'assureur continuent, eux de réclamer 25 milliards de dollars aux Etats-Unis.

Reuters
L'assureur AIG préfère finalement éviter le scandale : après avoir laissé planer le doute quelques jours, il a fait savoir mercredi soir qu'il ne porterait pas plainte contre l'Etat américain, se dissociant ainsi de certains actionnaires qui estiment avoir été spoliés lors du sauvetage de 2008 et réclament 25 milliards de dollars au gouvernement. Après un conseil d'administration mercredi matin, le président du groupe, Robert Miller, a tenté d'apaiser les choses en indiquant qu'AIG « continuait de remercier l'Amérique pour son soutien ».
Les experts étaient nombreux à avoir anticipé ce dénouement, jugeant peu probable que l'entreprise prenne le risque de l'impopularité : « Je ne vois pas AIG faire un énorme bras d'honneur à ceux qui l'ont sauvé », indiquait mardi Neil Barofsky, ancien responsable du programme de sauvetage des banques (TARP). Le seul fait qu'AIG envisage cette démarche avait provoqué, mercredi matin, un tonnerre d'indignation dans la presse américaine, sur les réseaux sociaux et même au Congrès.
L'initiative avait effectivement de quoi choquer : comme Lehman Brothers, l'entreprise a failli sombrer en septembre 2008, après avoir lancé des paris très hasardeux sur les « credit default swaps » (CDS), ces assurances contre le défaut de paiement. Elle ne doit sa survie qu'à l'Etat, qui lui a consacré plus de 182 milliards de dollars sous forme de liquidité et de garanties. « C'est comme si un malade faisait un procès à son docteur pour lui avoir sauvé la vie », résume Mark Williams, professeur de finance à l'Université de Boston. Le groupe, qui n'a pas peur du paradoxe, vient d'ailleurs de lancer une campagne publicitaire autour du slogan « Thank you America » pour remercier les contribuables de leur aide.
Taux d'intérêt « punitifs »
Les actionnaires ne contestent pas que le soutien de l'Etat était nécessaire. Mais ils estiment qu'il s'est fait dans de très mauvaises conditions pour eux. Leurs intérêts étaient défendus, mercredi, par un homme qui connaît l'entreprise mieux que personne : Maurice Greenberg, patron d'AIG pendant une quarantaine d'années, qui en était encore le premier actionnaire en 2008. C'est lui qui a engagé cette plainte contre le gouvernement américain, dès 2011.
Que lui reproche-t-il exactement ? D'avoir dilué le poids des actionnaires en acquérant 92 % du capital de l'entreprise et en lui appliquant des taux d'intérêt « punitifs », à hauteur de 14 %. L'Etat a effectivement beaucoup gagné dans cette opération (23 milliards de dollars au total). Il aurait également violé le cinquième amendement de la Constitution, qui interdit à la puissance publique de prendre possession de la propriété privée « sans une juste compensation ». Ces arguments n'ont pas convaincu le tribunal de New York, qui a déjà rejeté la requête des actionnaires. Ceux-ci ne disposent plus que d'un dernier recours, à Washington.


Revenir en haut
Danyves
Groupe des Six

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 16 Oct 2012
Messages: 8 405

MessagePosté le: Jeu 10 Jan - 09:44 (2013)    Sujet du message: Les Banques ARCHIVES 2012 2013 Répondre en citant

BLANCHIMENT  | 8 janvier 2013
Solution négociée en vue pour deux financiers genevois

BLANCHIMENT FRANCO-SUISSE  | 7 janvier 2013
Le gestionnaire de chez HSBC obtient sa liberté provisoire


Revenir en haut
Danyves
Groupe des Six

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 16 Oct 2012
Messages: 8 405

MessagePosté le: Jeu 10 Jan - 12:31 (2013)    Sujet du message: Les Banques ARCHIVES 2012 2013 Répondre en citant

REVUE DE PRESSE 11:20

Quand UBS s’accuse elle-même d’être arroganteAndrea Orcel, le chef de la banque d’investissement, juste après son audition à Londres. (Facundo Arrizabalaga/Keystone)


Avec des auditions à Londres qui se poursuivent ce jeudi, UBS continue de faire face aux conséquences du scandale de la manipulation du Libor. La presse évoque cette attitude de «profil bas» devant une commission parlementaire britannique


Revenir en haut
Danyves
Groupe des Six

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 16 Oct 2012
Messages: 8 405

MessagePosté le: Jeu 10 Jan - 12:33 (2013)    Sujet du message: Les Banques ARCHIVES 2012 2013 Répondre en citant

BANQUES 09:48

Credit Suisse vend ses activités de fonds indiciels à BlackRock
L’opération fait partie des plans stratégiques de désinvestissement annoncés l’été dernier. Le montant de la vente n’est pas divulgué


Revenir en haut
Danyves
Groupe des Six

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 16 Oct 2012
Messages: 8 405

MessagePosté le: Jeu 10 Jan - 14:07 (2013)    Sujet du message: Les Banques ARCHIVES 2012 2013 Répondre en citant

FINANCE-MARCHÉS 
Banque : les Etats-Unis imposent leur loi à l'Europe
10/01 | 07:00 | Rejane Reibaud et Thibault Madelin 
La loi fiscale Fatca qui obligera les banques à fournir des informations au fisc américain pourrait coûter 500 millions d'euros aux banques françaises. 


Revenir en haut
Danyves
Groupe des Six

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 16 Oct 2012
Messages: 8 405

MessagePosté le: Jeu 10 Jan - 18:30 (2013)    Sujet du message: Les Banques ARCHIVES 2012 2013 Répondre en citant

17:21 USA: la Fed a reversé 89 milliards de dollars au Trésor en 2012, un record (AFP)

Revenir en haut
Danyves
Groupe des Six

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 16 Oct 2012
Messages: 8 405

MessagePosté le: Jeu 10 Jan - 18:46 (2013)    Sujet du message: Les Banques ARCHIVES 2012 2013 Répondre en citant

BlackRock to Buy $17.6 Billion ETF Unit From Credit Suisse

Revenir en haut
Danyves
Groupe des Six

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 16 Oct 2012
Messages: 8 405

MessagePosté le: Jeu 10 Jan - 19:20 (2013)    Sujet du message: Les Banques ARCHIVES 2012 2013 Répondre en citant

SCANDALE DU LIBOR 17:52

Marcel Rohner se dit «choqué» et «honteux» de l’implication d’UBS
L’ancien directeur général d’UBS a déclaré jeudi matin devant des parlementaires britanniques n’avoir été mis au courant de l’implication de la première banque suisse qu’en 2011 en lisant la presse


Revenir en haut
Danyves
Groupe des Six

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 16 Oct 2012
Messages: 8 405

MessagePosté le: Jeu 10 Jan - 19:46 (2013)    Sujet du message: Les Banques ARCHIVES 2012 2013 Répondre en citant

©Shaun Curry/FTFrom COMPANIES 3:43pmSants calls for tighter rules on big banksEx-FSA chief warns over regulation of foreign lenders’ branches


Revenir en haut
Danyves
Groupe des Six

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 16 Oct 2012
Messages: 8 405

MessagePosté le: Jeu 10 Jan - 19:47 (2013)    Sujet du message: Les Banques ARCHIVES 2012 2013 Répondre en citant

RBS in Libor Talks
Royal Bank of Scotland's board has held talks with British regulators over whether two executives should quit over the bank's alleged attempt to rig interest-rate benchmarks, people familiar with the matter said. 5:45 PM 


Revenir en haut
Contenu Sponsorisé






MessagePosté le: Aujourd’hui à 21:50 (2016)    Sujet du message: Les Banques ARCHIVES 2012 2013

Revenir en haut
Montrer les messages depuis:   
Poster un nouveau sujet   Répondre au sujet    FINANCES : Sortir de la boîte, Penser autrement Index du Forum -> ARCHIVES Billets -> Archives Revue de presse Toutes les heures sont au format GMT + 2 Heures
Aller à la page: <  1, 2, 322, 23, 2453, 54, 55  >
Page 23 sur 55

 
Sauter vers:  

Portail | Index | créer son forum | Forum gratuit d’entraide | Annuaire des forums gratuits | Signaler une violation | Conditions générales d'utilisation
Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
Traduction par : phpBB-fr.com